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Hello everyone. I found a way to manage my time in a way to put a constant effort in my guitar play, of course, with Rocksmith. 

I have a Fender Stratocaster and I'm using (recommended in the guitar shop) Fender strings 250L Light (nickel-plated steel). 

While I still consider myself a beginner I saw some improvements in my guitar play but sometimes it feels that these strings are not the best, especially for bends. So I have two questions.

 

How often do you need to change the strings?

 

Should I change my strings with some other model? 

 

Thanks everyone 

 

Calin

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How often do you need to change the strings?

Need is a bad word for that, in my oppinion. Because there is only one basic need to change them : Broken String.

 

But to be serious. Everyone have to make there own experiences about changing strings and when. Because i made the expierences and hear it often. That many person changing there strings for diffrent reason. Person A change them after the turn black, Person B because they dont have the same sound like new once. Other Person only change them when the strings ripping of and only change this strings. You see it's something about the personal taste.

 

 

 

Should I change my strings with some other model?

Exactly the same thing. It's a personal taste thing. But also a thing about, what genre do you prefer to play. The other point is the Sound of the strings. If you like them take it. There is no right strings or wrong strings. In my nearly 9 years of playing, i try not many strings only about 5 diffrent brands and i found my fav. strings. But like i say u have to try it by your own. It's a try and Error Game

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Thanks Olorin. 

 

So regarding the diameter of the strings, its all about personal comfort? I was told that thinner strings are for beginners and after some time and practice one should try thicker ones.

I'll try to practice the bends more and see if not my hand is really the issue here :)

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Thanks Olorin. 

 

So regarding the diameter of the strings, its all about personal comfort? I was told that thinner strings are for beginners and after some time and practice one should try thicker ones.

Well I'm not a guitar master. But yeah i know that, with the thinner strings. But personally, i think you play with strings that you like. It's not about the diameter of the strings. Because, let me explain it, you can play with thinner strings like 9-42 (probably the thinnes Strings). Then you have a good basic for learning the technics and knows very fast how much strenght you have to use for Bends and stuff. But and know come the point where i say thinner not normaly better if you change your strings and make them a little bit thicker. Then your muscles have to learn it complete new and that means you need more time again.

 

So my personal advice would be this:

 

Go to a Guitar shop, talk to the salesperson and explain him that you want some new strings for a special genre, like rock, metal or what ever also if you play more Rhythm or are you more the single Note Solo player. Most of the time he gives you a good pack of Strings. Then you know the diameter and after that it is again a try and error game to find the right strings for you.

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After some trial and error I now use 11-50. It took me a bit to get used to heavier strings but I really like the sound they give, so for me it really was worth it, and once you get used to it, you don't see the difference.

 

In the end it's a matter of preference, as the people above me said, so try different kinds until you find what suits you best.

 

And regarding when to changue the strings, well, it is true that new strings have their own sound that fades over time, but I don't believe it's worth enough so I would changue them constantly, so I'm one of those guys who tends to only changue them when one breaks. In the end, the choice is yours.

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If you clean your strings regularly you don't have to change them that often, as long as you buy good quality strings (I prefer NYXL's).  

 

It's usually recommended that you clean your strings every time you use your guitar depending on how often you play, but you should at least try and clean them once a week.  They'll sound better and last longer too.

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I changed my bass strings this week.  They were originals and I got the bass in 2006 or 2006.  Never did break one.  I would have changed my guitar strings toon, but I have decided to purchase a tronical tuner.  It will let me switch the tunings between RS songs quickly.  I've loaded up songs and then backed out because they were in a different tuning.

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Yeah, it is pretty much all preference, there is no 'right' answer as far as gauge and brand go. I prefer lighter strings because it feels like I am fighting the instrument less, but others go the complete opposite. I keep my LP style instrument with thicker strings because it is nice to have the option and it just feels right with that instrument. It really is a matter of whatever works for you, do not let anyone tell you otherwise. While I would suggest experimenting, something to consider is that when you change gauges you will almost certainly have to readjust your intonation for the new gauge. Most guitars it is not super difficult or anything, but if you are afraid of that kind of stuff it is something to consider as well. Most people get a comfort zone of string gauge/type and brand that they like. I have played through most of the major brands myself and have my own preferences. As far as changing goes, I personally draw the line when they are noticeably rusty. The D'addarios and Dunlops (my preferential brands) usually last at least a month before that starts to happen, give or take a few weeks depending on the humidity and how much I wail on them. I know some people play them until they literally break, and some people will change them almost constantly so they always have that wonderful new string feel. Whatever floats your boat.

 

Also, wipe your strings when you are done playing. It takes like one minute and it will greatly enhance the life of your strings. So basically everyone here has given you good advice. Last thing, is that I would spend more time with any decent brand names regular strings before moving onto things like NYXLs. NYXLs are nice strings, but they are 2x the cost and in my opinion pretty diminishing returns unless they offer you something that you really want. I played through a few packs of the expensive strings I got on sale and found them to perform fairly similarly to the same brands regular strings, and in the NYXLs case they did not last any longer either. YMMV.

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So for strings, who ever told you 9-42's are for beginners is an idiot. Play what feels good. I have 9-42s on my e-flat and e guitars. And 13 to 57s on my D guitars. The heavier strings hold drop tunings better. But more to the point I prefer Ernie Balls, but D'addario or even Martins will work if you like them. And there are many pros that will even play 8s. Seriously dude strings are entirely preference. What that person might have meant is that it's easier to control 9s (light strings) which is true. Heavier strings will give you more sustain in general. But if your fingers are used to the 9s just go with it. I've had to shove a damn sock on the first fret of my one guitar strung with Ernie Ball 9-42s because the strings are really hard to shut up. So do what feels right and sounds good. 

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I personally started out on some stupidly heavy strings after making my transition from bass to guitar 13-80's i believe and that allowed me to hone my technique on bending as i am having to work more to reach the required pitch and it allowed me to focus on a wider range on tunings, until i get another guitar... people often say that the thicker strings have a 'fuller' tone  but as the rest have said.. try different ones out and see what works, or even make your own custom gauges by mixing different size strings together you could end up with something like 008, 010, 016, 026, 046, 059

 

As far as brands go, i have tried out, martin, ernie ball, gibson, fender and d'addario, and i am personally sticking with d'addario as they are the strings that have put up with my love of the tremolo for the longest XD

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Yeah, just use whatever gauge you like.

 

As a beginner I had 9s. Then several years later I moved to 10s, and even tried 11s as I wanted to be Stevie Ray Vaughan or Hendrix, but i quickly learned I don't have massive hands like those guys do.

 

Also, about 10 years later,  I started developing tendonitis and CTS-like systems -- heavy gauge strings, small hands and too many hours of practice with no breaks,  wasn't a good combo for me, so I just now use 9-gauge strings and I'm perfectly happy.  Much easier on my hands and wrists. When I'm using a Telecaster-type guitar, it's also much easier to do behind-the-nut bends with 9-gauge strings.

 

As for as brands, I went with Ernie Ball first. They were the cheapest. Later when I got older, and I started getting D'addario as they stayed fresh longer. I also use Elixir strings or Cleartone, as they'll stay fresh for a really long time, at the sacrifice of some sparkle, but they are really durable (months or years even). 

 

Interestingly, i thought I forever ditched Ernie Ball, but when I got my Music Man guitar recently, I just fell in love with the sound of Ernie Balls again (it came with the cheap Regular Slinky strings), and I think they are better made now. They seem to last longer than before (I read they package their strings differently now so they stay more fresh). They still will get worn out like your usual non-coated strings, but they sound pretty good for budget strings.

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If you clean your strings regularly you don't have to change them that often, as long as you buy good quality strings (I prefer NYXL's).  

 

It's usually recommended that you clean your strings every time you use your guitar depending on how often you play, but you should at least try and clean them once a week.  They'll sound better and last longer too.

How would you recommend to clean them? Do you use a certain product? Just a soft cloth?  

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How would you recommend to clean them? Do you use a certain product? Just a soft cloth?  

 

 

I wipe them down before and after I play with a soft, clean, lint-free cloth.  I wipe down the neck and body as well.

 

Then once or twice a week, depending on how dirty the strings have gotten, I use either Gibson String cleaner on a cloth or the Ernie Ball string cleaning wipes.  They're both basically just diluted rubbing alcohol mixed with some oils that also help condition the fretboard (though not that much).

 

Then when I change the strings, I use Gibson fretboard conditioner to oil the fretboard and Gibson guitar polish to polish the entire body and neck.  That keeps the neck playing smooth and fast, and keeps my guitars looking like they're still brand new.

 

I don't really have a preference for any specific product, and there are tons of different brands/formulas of string cleaner, fretboard conditioner, and polish available.  I just use the Gibson stuff because it came in a three pack and the Ernie Ball wipes are super cheap and one wipe can do at least 3 guitars.  The Gibson polish also smells nicer than some of the other brands and doesn't require a large amount of buffing to get a great shine.

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