Jump to content

  • 0

String Break Problem


SixOneHate
 Share

Question

Hey guys. I play Rocksmith quite a bit and I frequently change tunings. Anywhere between standard and drop C. I keep breaking strings from all the tuning changes, even after a week or two of new strings. It keeps breaking on the tuning post. Mainly the high E string. Does anyone have any reccomendations on what strings will hold up frequent changes? Or maybe some tips to help prevent this? Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

I have a affinity telecaster.Its a great guitar for my skill level(noob) Ive noticed that the metal used for the tuning peg  or whatever they are called is softer than the strings so they kinda cut into the pegs at the spot where you wind them.Anyway you can file the edges down just a little so that they arenet so sharp.Its worked for me so far(strings were cutting a groove into the tuning peg).I also took a peice of gorrilla tape and stuck it through the hole and under the high e string so that the metal doesnt contact the string and cut it.I dont know how long it'll work because Im constanly changing the tuning as well.Ive also started sorting songs by tuning that way I can just play a bunch that are they same so I dont switch so much.Its getting really annoying having to replace one string all the time.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I'm not sure if this is a problem of changing tuning. It's more a problem of tension of the strings.

Lower stings don't break easy, but if they are under to much tension, they may loose sustain ability.

 

If your higher string is very thin 0.8-0.10, you won't have to tighten it to much to tune it in a higher key

It's easy to bend then.

But if you use it for B-tuning, it will be to loose to keep the right note when pressing the fret.

 

If the high string is bigger, 11, it's good for low tuning. But it needs a lot of tension to reach higher keys.

What's worse, if you play lot of Santana like stuff with an 11, with lots of full bendings, it will hurt your fingers and break the strings.

High strings get more bended notes.

 

Finally, I've got a guitar with a fixed bridge to the wood, and one Ibanez with a flexible bridge, holden by two big springs on the back side. I never broke a string on the Ibanez, and bendings are much easier to do.

 

Finally strings break at the tuning keys on the head. From a Physics point of view, a spring breaks early when it's too dry. My giant garage door spring broke because I forgot to keep it oiled.

 

So maybe putting some vaseline like cream on the string close to the tuning knob to protect against humidity changes may be an experience to try for.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Lots of tuning changes, from (presumably you mean) standard E to drop C, high E strings breaking...  sounds perfectly normal to me man :)

 

One of the reasons people use different guitars for different tunings.  Strings "settle down" into a certain tension, if you keep changing that tension then you are causing the strings to become weak, this happens with all metals (keep bending a paperclip in the same place and it will eventually snap).

 

What struck me is that fact they keep breaking on the tuning post, are you winding them on properly (maybe post a pic of your tuning post)?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I have found that cheaper strings I buy in ten packs tend to last longer for me. If I decide to "treat" my guitar to a nice set of boutique strings, I can be sure I will break one within a few days. Usually the B or G. I tend to fool myself into believing that differences in strings will help me sound better. Not at my level. Another few hours of practice....now that will make me sound better!

 

Oh, but those fresh strings do feel so nice under the fingers.

 

Anyway, back to the problem at hand, if you are breaking consistently at one tuner you might try moving them around. Swap out the G and High E heads and see if that helps. Maybe you have a tiny burr in there that is cutting into the string.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Thanks for all the advice. I wish I had the money to just buy a few guitars for each tuning. I've tried different ways of stringing but it seemed to have to effect. I'll have to check out the burr thing. It could be since the high E seems breaking more than anything else. The paper clip analogy makes sense. Never really thought of it that way. I will have to try a lube/oil and see if that helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Cheapest recommendation : try the thinnest 3 string you can find for the E-string, and check how long they last. I bet the thinnest lasts longer because it requires less tension. Yes metal gets tired, but that takes month's and years. My metal acoustic strings have ten years !! Never broke. And I really jammed on it some days ago. I don't put my guitar near a heat source also.

 

Here's a link about what I was talking about https://www.super-vee.com/technology.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

After you get more experience, you'll be able to tell when strings are dead.

They will sound dull and lifeless.

 

Ever put on new strings and been like... wow, this feels / sounds  so much better!!

 

changing strings every week or two if you play a lot is normal.

 

You can make them live longer with fast fret and good cleaning.

The truth is.....

 

 

 

I lied about everything.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This thread is quite old. Please consider starting a new thread rather than reviving this one.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. - Privacy Policy