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Small tuning problem....


calin_the_dream
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Hello everyone.

 

I have a small problem with my guitar. I have a Fender Stratocaster with Fender 250L strings. It's the one made is Mexico (unfortunately I cannot afford the US ones), and when I retune my guitar, I have to do it several times until the new tuning is right, so switching from one tuning to another is very very annoying. 

Maybe the strings are not the best but as I am a novice I just went in the shop and asked the people in there to recommend me the best ones. 

So, everyone has the same problem, should I try to use first an external tuner of is there an autotuning option in Rocksmith so that I do not have to retune the strings?

 

This makes it almost impossible for me to try and play songs with other tunings and every time I switch I spent an awful lot of time to adjust the strings properly.

 

Thank you in advance, looking forward for positive advice :)

 

Calin

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I thought of one thing that could be happening. When you first pluck the string, the sound can be a bit sharper or flatter than as the string resonates. With the tuner in in Rocksmith this appears to be more exaggerated than with a normal tuner. So, if you are tuning while the string is resonating you actually end up tuning a bit flat. In standard tuning this does not seem to affect the game that much, but in dropped tuning RS seems to be a bit pickier. The way to get around this is to continually pick the string as you tune. I hope this helps.

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Hello everyone.

 

I have a small problem with my guitar. I have a Fender Stratocaster with Fender 250L strings. It's the one made is Mexico (unfortunately I cannot afford the US ones), and when I retune my guitar, I have to do it several times until the new tuning is right, so switching from one tuning to another is very very annoying. 

 

That's just the way things are with a floating bridge. Changing the tension in one string affects the tension in the other strings which throws them out of tune. 

 

If you don't want to go through the multiple re-tunings to get it right then there are ways of locking the bridge. Just google "Locking a floating bridge". You can also buy devices which allow you to switch between floating and locked.

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It's easy to block the bridge (and probably recommended if you're a beginner.)  It's mostly a matter of fitting a wedge of wood behind it. 

 

The worst part of the Fender trem is when you break a string while you're onstage and playing that awesome solo you've worked your butt off trying to learn... keeps life interesting, I guess.....

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Hmmm, this idea about blocking the bridge is really interesting. I will give it a try. 

 

Well, about getting on a stage ... I never dream about it, but to be able to do a great solo would be really great (I would really love to manage one day the ones in Comfortably Numb) 

 

I never thought that this construction of the guitar could lead to such a mess in tuning it. 

 

Thank you everyone :)

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Hmmm, this idea about blocking the bridge is really interesting. I will give it a try. 

 

Well, about getting on a stage ... I never dream about it, but to be able to do a great solo would be really great (I would really love to manage one day the ones in Comfortably Numb) 

 

I never thought that this construction of the guitar could lead to such a mess in tuning it. 

 

Thank you everyone :)

 

 

Well, you chose an excellent guitar to start out with. If it helps, I'm pretty sure Gilmour used super-light strings. Like .08s. Which is why he's able to do those wicked bends. Also, practice the pentatonic scale in the session mode -- that's the mode he uses mostly, I think.

 

The Fender trem was revolutionary in its day -- before that, the only real alternative was the Bigsby. Which could go down, but not up. Fender made modern rock n' roll possible. Jimi Hendrix wouldn't have existed without that trem. Nor Gilmour.

 

The trick to the trem is that once you've got it set up the way you like it, never take off all of the strings. Just change them one string at a time.

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